Practical data journalism

Is your budget tight and your time precious? Do you find data journalism too hard to learn?  Do you feel overwhelmed by data?

What you are looking for is "down to earth" data journalism, tips and tricks to process information faster and better. This course focuses on data journalism as part of your normal workflow. It teaches you all the skills you need for finding and processing data ‘on the spur of the moment’

Once you learn how to deal with big data in the newsroom or beyond, your reward will be great stories and new angles.

DATE & TIME

The Master Class will start on  Monday 8 December at 13:00 and will end on Tuesday 9 December at 13:00.

The networking dinner, included in the course fee, will be held on Monday night at 19:00. Full details will be given during the Master Class.

TARGET AUDIENCE

  • Journalists and reporters who want to learn to use data to make news stories with fresh, new angles.

OUTCOME

  • Learn the skills to plan and execute new stories based on data journalism.
  • Understand where and  how to find and interrogate data  and the art of a good hypothesis
  • Get inspired by, and learn from successful data journalism stories.

CONTENT OUTLINE

MODULE 1: INTRODUCTION TO DATA JOURNALISM

History of data journalism
It all started with computer precision journalism back in the sixties.  In 2014, data journalism borrows heavily from the past. We start with a quick overview of the history of data journalism.

Five forms of data journalism
There are, in general, five forms of data journalism for public broadcasters:

  1. Hidden data journalism
  2. Interactive data journalism
  3. Data as the story
  4. Personalized data journalism
  5. Data journalism as eye candy

MODULE 2: TELL ME WHERE THE TRUTH IS

The art of finding smoking guns
Without a strategy to find news in data, processing data is hard. Where do you start? You will work with data of the New York Times to find cheating athletes. You will open the treasure chest of mobile apps by studying a taxi app that gives you at least five practical ideas. And we look at data of an elderly home that leads to six possible story angles. After this module, you’ll know all the “red flags” for finding news in data.

MODULE 3: LYING WITH NUMBERS

Avoiding common pitfalls
It’s paramount that you know how deceptive statistics can be. Let’s study some common pitfalls. Why is an average not always an average? How can you misuse percentages? How do governments hide bad news in data?

Case studies:

  • How did the Dutch and Swiss railway hide what really happened?
  • And why is Swiss cheese deadly?

MODULE 4: INTERVIEWING DATA

You will learn how to interview data by using Excel. The art of cleaning, sorting, filtering can be learned without any previous knowledge of Excel. We’ll also work with a Pivot-table, enabling you to see complex layers in data. After this module you’ll feel proud of yourself. You don’t need all options in Excel, just the ones that make sense for your daily workflow.

MODULE 5: CASE STUDY - DATA DRILLING WITH FACEBOOK GRAPH

We will work with Facebook Graph, a brand new beta from Facebook that you will get access to during the course.  You learn how to cross-reference millions of people with a weird, but simple language. You want to find people that visited North-Korea, are 30 years old and live in your country? No problem. You want to find out which people are hurt by the crisis in Ukraine? Graph will solve it with a strange language of “what”, “where”, “when” and “who”. (The “why” should be your expertise)

MODULE 6: LEARNING FROM THE BEST AND THE WORST

What skills are needed for bigger data journalism projects? We’ll discuss the most important ones by learning from the best. This is the time to talk about your own ideas, even when they are still fragile.

Which data journalism projects failed miserably and why? What happens if a coder, reporter or graphical artist takes the lead in data journalism? What can you outsource and how? We’ll show you a complete case starting with a simple data request to a finished story - with real humans in it.

MODULE 7: THE ART OF FINDING DATA

In this groundbreaking and somewhat contra-intuitive module you learn how to find original data. The key to that is that you know how bureaucracy works. How are statistics collected? Mostly through empty forms, either online or in questionnaires. So what would happen if we would start searching for “empty forms”? Great things.

How do you find out who is responsible for any data in any organization? How do you contact them? What makes data collectors nervous? What doesn’t?

MODULE 8: TOOLS FOR THE NEWSROOM

In this module we’ll look at some of the best quick, but not dirty, data journalism tools.

You will learn to work with Google Fusion and make a map. Let’s make a beautiful timeline.  We’ll even scratch the surface of scraping data from websites.

MODULE 9: WRAP UP

Back to the office: what now?

GUEST SPEAKER

Sylke Gruhnwald, Head of SRF data and former head  of digital journalism at Neue Zürcher Zeitung
by Skype will talk about:

  • Ways of working at SRF data
  • Team members and their skill sets
  • Bringing together the best of each platform (TV, radio and online) for one large story set

FACULTY MEMBER

Eurovision ACADEMY Faculty member Henk van EssHenk van Ess
Guest lecturer universities | Social Media & Deep Web training | OSINT | Independent web & new media consultant | Author

Dutch-born investigative reporter Henk van Ess embraces everything that helps him find news in data. He is deeply involved in the worldwide training of reporters. Henk works as guest lecturer at universities in major European cities. As a "tech and new media expert", according to The Economist and New York Times, he writes columns for BBC Academy, PBS and Pro Publica and just finished "Handbook Datajournalism" with Hille van der Kaa. Full profile on LinkedIn

Henk is a member of Eurovision ACADEMY Faculty.

 

Details

08 - 09 Dec 2014

Venue

EBU Geneva

Registration Deadline

08 Dec 2014

Registration details

Fee

  • EUR 750 for 1st participant
  • EUR 375 Euro from 2nd participant from same company

The price includes tuition, course material, coffee breaks and the networking dinner.
It does not include any other meals, travel and hotel costs. 

Payment and cancellation policy

Scholarships

Thanks to the EBU Partnership Programme, a limited number of individual scholarships are available to enable participation in Eurovision ACADEMY course.

Accommodation

Eurovision ACADEMY do not make hotel reservations. However, we have negotiated competitive rates with some of the hotels near the venue and the city centre. Please contact the hotel of you choice directly. 

Hotels offering special rates for the EBU/Eurovision

Hotels in Geneva and in France with low rates (pdf)

Contact

Hélène Rauby-Matta
Business Development Manager
Eurovision Academy
+41 22 717 24 21
raubymatta@ebu.ch

 

Working languages

English